mosquitos-feature

Key Public Health Messages from Mass. Dept. of Public Health 2016


October 3, 2016

 

MDPH identified three West Nile virus positive mosquito samples tested during week 39. MDPH also identified one WNV human case in Middlesex County; this brings the total to six WNV human cases in 2016. WNV risk levels remain at high in parts of Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, and Suffolk counties. Evening temperatures have begun to decline across the state; residents should continue to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live until the first hard frost. MDPH has identified four EEE positive mosquito samples for 2016. Multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Mosquito testing conducted at the State Public Health Laboratory will conclude on 10/07/16. Check your risk levels throughout the season by visiting www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Establish good mosquito avoidance habits now

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Repair screens

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

September 26, 2016

 

MDPH identified 13 West Nile virus positive mosquito samples tested during week 38. MDPH also identified two WNV human cases in Middlesex and Norfolk counties; this brings the total to five WNV human cases in 2016. These findings prompted WNV risk levels increases in Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, and Suffolk counties. Although evening temperatures have begun to decline across the state; residents should continue to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live until the first hard frost. MDPH has identified four EEE positive mosquito samples for 2016. Multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Check your risk levels throughout the season by visiting www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Establish good mosquito avoidance habits now

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Repair screens

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

September 19, 2016

 

MDPH identified 15 West Nile virus positive mosquito samples tested during week 37. MDPH also identified the second WNV human case of 2016. These findings demonstrate that WNV continues to remain active across the state. Above average temperatures will continue to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). While early September is the peak period for WNV human transmission; residents should continue to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live until the first hard frost. MDPH has identified four EEE positive mosquito samples for 2016. Multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Check your risk levels throughout the season by visiting www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Establish good mosquito avoidance habits now

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Repair screens

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

September 12, 2016

 

MDPH identified 12 West Nile virus positive mosquito samples tested during week 36. These findings demonstrate that WNV continues to remain active across the state. Above average temperatures will continue to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). Early September is the peak period for WNV human transmission; residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. MDPH has identified four EEE positive mosquito samples for 2016. Multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Check your risk levels throughout the season by visiting www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Establish good mosquito avoidance habits now

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Repair screens

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

September 5, 2016

 

MDPH identified 28 West Nile virus positive mosquito samples tested during week 35. These findings demonstrate that WNV activity continues to expand and intensify across the state. Following a brief period of cool rainy weather above average temperatures will return which will continue to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). Early September is the peak period for WNV human transmission; residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. MDPH has identified four EEE positive mosquito samples for 2016. Multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Check your risk levels throughout the season by visiting www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Establish good mosquito avoidance habits now

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Repair screens

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms

 

 

August 29, 2016

 

MDPH identified 28 West Nile virus positive mosquito samples tested during week 34. These findings demonstrate that WNV activity continues to expand and intensify across the state. Above average temperatures and localized precipitation events are continuing to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). August and early September is the peak period for WNV human transmission, residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. MDPH identified two EEE positive mosquito samples tested during week 34. Multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Check your risk levels throughout the season by visiting www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Establish good mosquito avoidance habits now

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Repair screens

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

August 22, 2016

 

West Nile virus activity continues to expand and intensify across the state; MDPH identified 30 WNV positive mosquito samples tested during week 33. MDPH also identified the first WNV human case of 2016. These findings prompted increases to the WNV risk levels for communities in, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk counties. Above average temperatures and localized precipitation events are continuing to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). August and early September is the peak period for WNV human transmission, residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. During week 32 a single mosquito sample from Kingston tested EEE virus positive, this is the second EEE mosquito finding of the year; multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Check your risk levels throughout the season by visiting www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito

 

Establish good mosquito avoidance habits now

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Repair screens

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

August 15, 2016

 

West Nile virus activity continues to expand across the state; MDPH identified 25 WNV positive mosquito samples tested during week 32.These findings prompted increases to the WNV risk levels for communities in Barnstable, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, and Worcester counties. Above average temperatures and localized precipitation events are continuing to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). August and early September is the peak period for WNV human transmission, residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. A single mosquito sample from Middleborough has tested EEE virus positive; multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Check your risk levels throughout the season by visiting www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

August 8, 2016

 

West Nile virus positive mosquitoes collected from Chicopee, Springfield and Saugus led to an increase in the WNV risk level for communities immediately north of Boston and in the Springfield area. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are continuing to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). August and early September is the peak period for WNV human transmission, residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. A single mosquito sample from Middleborough has tested EEE virus positive; multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

 

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

August 1, 2016

 

West Nile virus positive mosquitoes were collected from Arlington, Boston, Chicopee, Malden and Waltham these findings led to an increase in the WNV risk level for communities in the Boston area, additional findings in neighboring towns are likely within the next few weeks. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are continuing to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). A single mosquito sample from Middleborough has tested EEE virus positive; multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. August and early September is the peak period for WNV human transmission, residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

 

July 25, 2016

 

West Nile virus positive mosquitoes were collected from Boston and Malden; additional findings in neighboring towns are likely within the next few weeks. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are continuing to produce large mosquito populations among species most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). A single mosquito sample from Middleborough has tested EEE virus positive; multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

July 18, 2016

 

West Nile virus positive mosquitoes have been collected from Worcester and Brookline for 2 weeks in a row indicating that risk for human infection from WNV has increased to moderate in the communities of Brookline, Auburn, Millbury and Worcester. Additional findings in neighboring towns are likely within the next few weeks. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events have produced large mosquito populations among species those most likely to spread West Nile virus (Culex species). A single mosquito sample from Middleborough tested EEE virus positive; multiple negative samples and low populations of Culiseta melanura indicate that risk is not increased or widespread at this time. Residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, abstain from sexual contact or use condoms consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

July 11, 2016

 

The first West Nile virus positive mosquitoes were collected from Worcester on July 1, 2016. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are likely to support increased mosquito populations, especially those most likely to spread West Nile virus. Residents should be urged to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a male partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, condoms should be used consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

July 5, 2016

 

Mosquito trapping and testing began June 13th. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are likely to support increased mosquito populations, especially those most likely to spread West Nile virus. If current weather patterns persist, mosquitoes infected with WNV are likely to be found soon.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: Zika virus continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day.

 

Travelers who are pregnant or part of a couple planning on becoming pregnant soon are advised not to travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. The most current information about locations at risk can be found here http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html. If residents choose to travel, prevent mosquito exposure by: using EPA registered mosquito repellents, cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, stay in places with screens and air-conditioning, or sleep under mosquito netting.

 

In order to avoid sexual transmission of Zika virus from a male partner who has recently traveled to an area where Zika transmission is occurring, condoms should be used consistently and correctly during all sexual activity. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

 

June 27, 2016

 

Mosquito trapping and testing began June 13th. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are likely to support increased mosquito populations.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

June 20, 2016

 

Mosquito trapping and testing began June 13th. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are likely to support increased mosquito populations.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

 

Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

Use long sleeves to cover up when possible

Repair screens

Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 


 

t  2015 Key Public Health Messages from MDPH

 


 

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