mosquitos-feature

Key Public Health Messages from Mass. Dept. of Public Health – 2015


October 19, 2015

 

Most, if not all, of Massachusetts experienced a hard frost during the October 17-19 weekend. Risk for mosquito-borne disease is virtually eliminated by the first local hard frost which kills most remaining adult mosquitoes. A hard, or killing frost, is defined meteorologically as two consecutive hours of temperatures below 28 degrees Fahrenheit or three hours below 32 degrees. This occurs at different times for different communities, and there may be variation within communities based on local geography. MDPH does not have meteorological data or expertise and cannot determine when individual communities have experienced a hard frost. Sources of information to assist local officials with determining whether a hard frost has occurred can be found on the weather reports from local media outlets and through the National Weather Service at http://www.erh.noaa.gov/box/stationobs.shtml.

 

There have been nine cases of WNV infection in people identified so far this year. Although risk from WNV infection is negligible at this time, additional cases may be identified in people exposed prior to the hard frost.

 

October 13, 2015

 

There have been eight human cases of WNV identified so far this year.

 

The first sample of EEE positive mosquitoes was identified on 9/30/15. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

As temperatures cool down and days get shorter, the kinds of mosquitoes most likely to carry WNV and EEE will concentrate their activity during dusk. Although mosquito populations are declining, they will be active until the first hard frost. People over the age of 50 and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk for severe disease from WNV. Encourage residents to be diligent in preventing mosquito bites.

 

Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity and methods to avoid mosquito exposure

 

October 5, 2015

 

There have been six human cases of WNV identified so far this year. While evening temperatures are cooler, the weather continues to support mosquito populations and the risk of transmission to humans persists.

 

The first sample of EEE positive mosquitoes was identified on 9/30/15. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

Mosquitoes will be active until the first hard frost. People over the age of 50 and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk for severe disease from WNV. Encourage residents to be diligent in preventing mosquito bites.

 

Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity and methods to avoid mosquito exposure

 

September 28, 2015

 

There have been 3 human cases of WNV identified so far this year; more are anticipated. Although evenings have been cooler, the weather continues to support mosquito populations and the risk of transmission to humans persists.

 

There have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet however, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

September is the time of year when people are most likely to be exposed to infected mosquitoes. People over the age of 50 and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk for severe disease from WNV.

 

Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

September 21, 2015

 

The third human case of WNV was identified last week. While evening temperatures are forecast to be cooler and more seasonable making mosquitoes less active, risk from WNV exists across the Commonwealth.

 

There have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet however, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

September is the time of year when people are most likely to be exposed to infected mosquitoes. People over the age of 50 and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk for severe disease from WNV.

 

Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

September 14, 2015

 

The second human case of WNV was identified last week and risk is now considered to be moderate in 6 communities in Hampden County as well as in and around Boston. The warmer than average weather forecast indicates risk is persisting and people are urged to take steps to avoid mosquito bites regardless of where they live.

 

There have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet however, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

September is the time of year when people are most likely to be exposed to infected mosquitoes. People over the age of 50 and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk for severe disease from WNV.

 

Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

September 8, 2015

 

Although Labor Day may be in the unofficial end to summer, the weather patterns are continuing to support populations of mosquitoes that are responsible for spreading WNV. Moderate WNV risk persists in Boston and many surrounding suburbs; some risk exists in every community.

 

There have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet however, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

September is the time of year when people are most likely to be exposed to infected mosquitoes. People over the age of 50 and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk for severe disease from WNV.

 

Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

 

August 31, 2015

 

The State Public Health Laboratory confirmed the first human case of WNV last week. This summer’s weather patterns are producing larger than normal populations of the mosquitoes that are responsible for spreading WNV. Moderate WNV risk persists in Boston and many surrounding suburbs; some risk exists in every community.

 

Although there have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

September is the time of year when people are most likely to be exposed to infected mosquitoes. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

August 24, 2015

 

This summer’s weather patterns are producing larger than normal populations of the mosquitoes that are responsible for spreading WNV. Moderate WNV risk persists in Boston and many surrounding suburbs; some risk exists in every community.

 

Although there have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

August and early September are the time most people are exposed to infected mosquitoes. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

August 17, 2015

 

This summer’s weather patterns are producing larger than normal populations of the mosquitoes that are responsible for spreading WNV. Moderate WNV risk persists in Boston and many surrounding suburbs; some risk exists in every community.

 

Although there have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

August and early September are the time most people are exposed to infected mosquitoes. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

August 10, 2015

 

This summer’s weather patterns are producing larger than normal populations of the mosquitoes that are responsible for spreading WNV. Moderate WNV risk persists in Boston and many surrounding suburbs; some risk exists in every community.

 

Although there have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

August and early September are the time most people are exposed to infected mosquitoes. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

 

August 3, 2015

 

This summer’s weather patterns have produced larger than normal populations of the mosquitoes that are responsible for spreading WNV. Multiple WNV infected samples of mosquitoes have been found throughout Boston and many of its’ northern suburbs. WNV activity will increase and expand in area and some risk exists in every community.

 

Although there have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

Late July, August and early September are the time most people are exposed to infected mosquitoes. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

 

July 27, 2015

 

There have now been multiple findings of WNV in mosquitoes from Berkshire, Middlesex and Norfolk counties. Some risk from WNV exists everywhere in Massachusetts; historically, most cases have come from Suffolk, Norfolk, and Middlesex counties. The mosquitoes that spread WNV are well-adapted to living in urban areas.

 

Although there have been no EEE infected mosquitoes identified yet, some virus is probably present in birds and mosquitoes. Residents in areas where EEE activity has occurred in previous years should take all precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

 

Late July, August and early September are the time most people are exposed to infected mosquitoes. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito and make sure you know what to do to protect yourself.

 

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: The mosquito-borne virus, Chikungunya, continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day. Travelers to these areas should be strongly encouraged to use mosquito repellents any time they are outdoors and should make sure that there are intact screens on any open windows where they are staying.

 

 

July 20, 2015

 

Mosquito trapping and testing began June 16th and the first WNV positive mosquito was collected from Sheffield on July 8, 2015. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are likely to support increased mosquito populations.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: The mosquito-borne virus, Chikungunya, continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day. Travelers to these areas should be strongly encouraged to use mosquito repellents any time they are outdoors and should make sure that there are intact screens on any open windows where they are staying.

 

 

July 13, 2015

 

Mosquito trapping and testing began June 16th. Results to date have been negative for both WNV and EEE. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito. The current warm weather and pattern of precipitation events are likely to support increased mosquito populations.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: The mosquito-borne virus, Chikungunya, continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day. Travelers to these areas should be strongly encouraged to use mosquito repellents any time they are outdoors and should make sure that there are intact screens on any open windows where they are staying.

 

July 6, 2015

 

Mosquito trapping and testing began June 16th. Results to date have been negative for both WNV and EEE. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito. The current warm weather and precipitation events are likely to support increased mosquito populations.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: The mosquito-borne virus, Chikungunya, continues to be very active in the Caribbean, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day. Travelers to these areas should be strongly encouraged to use mosquito repellents any time they are outdoors and should make sure that there are intact screens on any open windows where they are staying.

 

June 29, 2015

 

Mosquito trapping and testing began June 16th. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito. The current warm weather and precipitation events are likely to support increased mosquito populations.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 

NOTE: The mosquito-borne virus, Chikungunya, continues to be very active in the Caribbean. The mosquitoes that spread this disease are active during the day. Travelers to that area should be strongly encouraged to use mosquito repellents any time they are outdoors and should make sure that there are intact screens on any open windows where they are staying.

 

June 22, 2015

 

Mosquito trapping and testing began June 15th. Check your risk levels throughout the season by going to the website www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito.

 

Remember that several 30 second PSA videos are available for download and use on your website to help promote prevention activities to your residents. These can be found at www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

 

Establish good habits now:

• Pick a repellent with an EPA-approved active ingredient

• Use long sleeves to cover up when possible.

• Repair screens

• Remove standing water to help reduce mosquito populations

• Teach children to be aware of mosquito activity around them and avoid it

 


 

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