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CMMCP Larval Control Program: updated 20-Jan-16


PLEASE NOTE: OUR POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ARE UNDER REVIEW, CHANGES MAY NOT BE REFLECTED IN THE INFORMATION ON THIS WEBPAGE


 

 

Program Commencement:

 

The larval program begins in March to coincide with the emergence of mosquito larvae from their egg casings. The exact date is determined by field observations of area swamps and wetlands. Once more than 50% of area wetlands are found to contain mosquito larvae then the field staff is dispatched to begin their surveillance and applications.

 

MOSQUITO LARVAE DIPPER

 

 

Larval Service Requests:

 

CMMCP receive request for investigations by the public each year through the phone system, website and personal visits. Larval habitats that are identified as real or potential breeding areas are databased and placed on field cards to be monitored throughout the larval mosquito breeding season.

 

FIELD SURVEILLANCE OF MOSQUITO LARVAE

 

Surveillance before an application:

 

Field technicians are trained to identify mosquito larvae among the numerous other aquatic organisms found in wetlands. Field Technicians record the average number of larvae found, the larval instar, as well as the application data on their daily reports. Wetlands and other larval mosquito habitats are recorded on field cards that are organized by town. Each larval habitat is given a unique number to be linked to a GIS system. On these field cards the following information is included:

 

·       Town

·       District #

·       Site #

·       Map Section

·       Date of first record

·       Prepared by

·       Location

·       Landowners

·       Comments

 

The following information about the habitat is also recorded:

 

  • Habitat Type
    • Spring brood
    • Reflood
    • Permanent
    • Container
    • Waste water
    • Other
  • Size of the area
  • Vegetation type
    • Cattail & low brush
    • Meadow Grasses & other aquatic vegetation
    • Heavy tree canopy & sparse underbrush
    • Heavy tree canopy & dense underbrush
    • Heavy tree canopy w/alders & grasses
    • Other

 

On the reverse of these field cards, the following application data is recorded:

 

  • Date of application
  • Applicator name
  • Larval Stage
  • Average number per dip
  • Type of product applied
  • Amount of product applied

 

The application data on the field cards is used by the Field Technicians to determine historical data to predict the likelihood of larval mosquito breeding in a given habitat. This information will be included in GIS application.

 

TYPICAL MOSQUITO HABITAT

 

Larval mosquito habitats are monitored throughout the breeding season from March through September on a rotational basis in each member city and town. The threshold for larval control is a minimum average of 1+ per 5 dips.

 

LARVAL SITE CARD (front)

 

LARVAL SITE CARD (back)

 

Extent of the Application:

 

The extent of the application in a confirmed breeding habitat is dependent on the label directions for application, and varies according to each product. The lowest label rate is used unless other factors dictate that a higher rate is advisable – all label recommendations are adhered to by CMMCP applicators. For more information on the products used for larviciding please check here.

 

BTI GRANULES

 

Control efficacy:

 

Control efficacy is recorded in a database to allow CMMCP to gauge the effectiveness of the control products in use as well as the application amounts. This database includes the following information:

 

  • Town
  • District #
  • Date
  • Map Section
  • Location
  • Type of area
  • Site #
  • Pre or Post information
  • Product type
  • Product amount
  • Instar data
  • Number per dip
  • Weather information
  • Name of Technician
  • Comments
  • Larval species data

 

Control efficacy data is limited at CMMCP due to labor constraints and other factors. All products used for larval mosquito control have been tested by the manufacturer, the EPA and other mosquito control agencies. Numerous research projects have studied the efficacy of these products, as well as adverse effects on non-target organisms.

 

The Children and Families Protection Act (CPA):    

 

Mosquito larval control products are exempt from the CPA pre-notification process providing that Category 4 products as classified by the EPA are used. Any product labeled for larval mosquito control with a signal word of "Warning" or “Caution” is acceptable. The 3 products used by CMMCP for larval/pupae control (Bti, methoprene and mineral oil) fall under this classification. While exempt, these products must still be listed on the school’s outdoor IPM plan. More information on the CPA is available here.

 

Larvicide Exclusions:

 

Property owners have the option under Mass. Pesticide Regulations, 333CMR 13.04, paragraph 6, subsection 1(b) to exclude their property from applications of pesticide. These areas are listed on the CMMCP “No Spray” list, and if the area is extensive a map is requested to be included with the exclusion request. This type of exclusion is uncommon in the CMMCP service area. For more information on the exclusion process please check here.

 

Catch basin program for Culex control:

 

Beginning in May of each year, we begin to apply methoprene in area catch basins for the control of Culex mosquitoes. This species of mosquito is implicated in the amplification of WNV among the bird population and possibly to humans.

 

Catch basin treatments will done in the following priority order:

1. Prior year WNV activity

2. Senior Centers and over 55 housing

3. Recreational areas

4. Schools (only if included as part of their outdoor IPM plan)

5. Neighborhoods

6. Industrial areas

 

This program will continue through the summer, and may be restarted in selected areas if WNV becomes endemic to an area. Many factors (time of year, weather, location, etc) will play into our response if/when WNV is confirmed in a given area. CMMCP will coordinate as much as possible with city and town public works departments to inform them of our application areas, and so they can schedule their basin cleaning accordingly.

 

 

ALTOSID PELLETS

 

FOURSTAR BRIQUETS

FourStar 45

 

HELICOPTER USED FOR AERIAL APPLICATIONS

 

Aerial Larval Program:

 

CMMCP has an aerial larval program in conjunction with several member towns. The towns pay for the larvicide product and contractor as a separate appropriation, and CMMCP provides surveillance and labor.  The threshold for aerial larval control is at least 1+ per 10 dips, with a minimum of 1 dip station per 250 acres. This program is dependent on many factors, including but not limited to:

 

  • Budget,
  • Identification of priority areas, and
  • Acreage

 

CMMCP will record pre- and post larval populations to determine the extent of the application and its efficacy. A report with this information is generated each year and given to the towns participating in the program. Click here for more information.

 

TOPOGRAPHIC MAP OF BILLERICA AERIAL LOCATIONS (partial – areas in red)

 

 

 

Pesticide Usage and Reporting:

 

All applicators write out 2 separate reports (one “Standard Work Report” and one “Pesticide Use Report – Larval Mosquito Control”) at the end of each shift with the following information:

 

  • Date of Report
  • City/Town
  • Truck registration
  • Employee name(s)
  • Larval instar information
  • Exact location
  • Site #
  • Product name
  • Product EPA registration #
  • Total amount applied
  • Amount applied at each location

 

These reports are photocopied and forwarded to each Health Department. All work reports are kept on file at the CMMCP office. We file an annual Pesticide Usage Reports with the Mass. Pesticide Bureau each year.