Marlboro West Nile Virus Information:

revised 17-August-07


Graphs showing mosquito population pre and post spraying are available here:

 

Graph 1 ~ Graph 2

 

A narrative describing this operation is now available (.pdf): Marlborough 2007


ULV spray areas done on August 1, 5 & 8, 2007 can be viewed here: http://www.cmmcp.org/ulvaugust3.htm (no spraying was done Aug. 3 due to thunderstorm activity).

 

THE EXPANDED SPRAY PROGRAM FOR WEST NILE VIRUS IN NORTHWESTERN MARLBORO HAS CONCLUDED FOR THE TIME BEING.

 

Additional spraying is not planned at this time, initial results have shown mosquito populations have been reduced, and additional mosquito testing has not identified new virus activity at this time.

 

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT WHILE THE RISK FROM WEST NILE VIRUS MAY HAVE BEEN LOWERED TO SOME EXTENT; IT IS NOT AT ZERO RISK; RESIDENTS NEED TO BE AWARE THAT WNV MAY STILL BE IN THE AREA, AND TO USE PERSONAL PROTECTION MEASURES (SEE BELOW) TO FURTHER REDUCE YOUR EXPOSURE AND LOWER YOUR RISK FROM MOSQUITOES. WNV WILL CONTINUE TO BE A THREAT UNTIL FREEZING TEMPERATURES BECOME PREDOMINANT IN THE AREA.


 

On July 26, 2007 the Mass. Dept. of Public Health (MDPH) confirmed that a bird collected on July 24 tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV). The Central Mass. Mosquito Control Project coordinated with MDPH and placed additional surveillance traps in the area the bird was found. CMMCP also expanded its treatment of catch basins in that area to reduce the larval population of Culex species and other mosquito species that prefer these areas for larval development. No spraying in this area was done at that time. A press release from MDPH was sent to all media outlets.

 

On August 1, 2007 MDPH confirmed that a collection of adult Culex mosquitoes collected July 30 tested positive for West Nile Virus. See press releases.

 

Areas around the surveillance trap are planned to be sprayed after sunset between 9pm and midnight on the evening of August 1, 2007 in coordination with the Marlborough Board of Health. A map of the intended spray areas is posted here: http://www.cmmcp.org/marlboroaug1.jpg. The product used for spraying by CMMCP is called sumithrin (d-phenothrin), and is the same product used by MDPH in southeastern Mass. last year for the aerial spraying event. Additional treatments in the same area may be planned for the evenings of August 3 and 5. Please check this link for a map of the areas done August 1: http://www.cmmcp.org/marlboroaug1a.jpg. Additional notifications will be posted on our website and using our phone system.

 

In 2006, there were three human cases of WNV, with no fatalities. While WNV can infect people of all ages, people over the age of 50 are at higher risk for severe disease. WNV is usually transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito.


 

Question about spraying and mosquito control can be found on the MDPH website here: http://www.mass.gov/dph/wnv/faq_mos.htm

 


Personal protection measures have an important role to play in monitoring for WNV and protecting themselves and their loved ones.

 

Avoid Mosquito Bites Be Aware of Peak Mosquito Hours – The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes. Consider rescheduling outdoor activities that occur during evening or early morning. Otherwise, take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing.

 

Clothing Can Help reduce mosquito bites. Although it may be difficult to do when it’s hot, wearing long-sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.

 

Apply Insect Repellent when you go outdoors. Use a repellent with DEET (N, Ndiethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, picaridin (KBR 3023), or oil of lemon eucalyptus [pmethane 3, 8-diol (PMD)] according to the instructions on the product label. DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and should be used in concentrations of 30% or less on older children. Oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years of age. Permethrin should only be applied on clothing according to label directions, never directly on the skin.

 

Mosquito-Proof Your Home Drain Standing Water – Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by either draining or getting rid of items that hold water. Check rain gutters and drains. Empty any unused flowerpots and wading pools, and change water in birdbaths frequently.

 

Install or Repair Screens – Some mosquitoes like to come indoors. Keep them outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors.

 

Report Dead Birds – Dead crows, blue jays or robins may be a sign that WNV is circulating among the birds and mosquitoes in an area. Call 1-866-MASS WNV to report a dead bird. By reporting dead birds, you can play an important role in monitoring WNV.

 

More information is available on the DPH website at

http://www.mass.gov/dph/wnv/wnv1.htm.

 

Information about WNV and EEE is also available by calling the DPH recorded  information line at 1-866-MASS-WNV (1-866-627-7698).

 

For more information please call CMMCP at (508) 393-3055